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August 19, 2008
New York–I was provoked when Fox newscaster Sheperd Smith announced tonight that there was a known terrorist living in Canada because our neighbor to the north didn’t have the heart to deport him.
Leave Your Comments: Do You Think This Man Should Be Deported?
The terrorist is question is Mahmoud Mohammad Issa Mohammad, 61. He was tried and convicted of terrorism (and maybe murder one) for killing an Israeli in 1968 while participating with a dangerous group he joined, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, that arranged for him and another person to attack an El Al Boeing 707 in Athens.

The plane was readying for takeoff when the two assaulted the aircraft with 83 rounds of ammunition and 6 grenades, killing one passenger.

Convicted and sentenced by a Greek court in March 1970 to 17 years in prison, Mohammad was released later that year, when six Palestinian terrorists hijacked a Greek airliner and threatened to blow it up unless he was freed. Mohammad slipped off to Cyprus, Spain, and finally – with his wife, Fadia, and three children – he reached Canada as a landed immigrant on Feb. 25, 1987.

When Canada found out about him–that he was a known terrorist–they wanted to deport him but couldn’t. Their quandery was a moral one–where would they send him? He was from Israel or Lebanon and had they deported him there the Israelis would have surely avenged the murder of one of their own by killing Mohammad.

Canada is good at cooperating with the US as long as it suits their interests, but they have no stomach for killing people, no matter what their past record. I checked Daniel Pipes blog and his report was extensive.
Here’s some more of what Daniel says:

A year after arriving in Canada, the Canadian government realized that he had lied on his immigration application about never having been convicted of a crime. “In December, 1988, he was judged unfit to remain in Canada and was to be deported,” said Pipes. “Mohammad gamed the system, however, and applied for refugee status. His claim was rejected but he held off deportation by appealing one decision after another against him. He currently lives in Brantford, Ontario.”

Pipes said he entered the picture in March 1994, when (along with Steven Emerson) “I testified in Toronto about Mohammad on behalf of the Department of Justice at one of his many judicial proceedings. To support the case that he could be deported to Lebanon without jeopardy to his precious person, I wrote a nearly ten-thousand-word report giving background on the situation in Lebanon generally and for Palestinians.”

Pipes said the government won this round, but that did little good.

More than a decade later, “Mohammad is still battling to stay in Canada, now listing a near-endless number of alleged infirmities (diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, chronic prostatitis, reactive depression, diabetic neuropathy, migraines, kidney disease, and hepatitis B) to justify his staying in the country. The terrorist, his doctor assures us, must take ASA, Losec, Naprosyn, Lipitor, Rivotril, Vasotec, Elavil, Nitrodur, Atenolol, Norvasc and Insulin. Not only that, but the poor man requires monthly check-ups and visits a cardiologist and endocrinologist every six months to manage his diabetes and heart disease. His lawyer, Barbara Jackman, concludes that “restrictions on access to medical care would be cruel and unusual.”

That’s the long and short of it. It angers me that terrorists go free sometimes, but you could rationalize it this way. There are many criminals walking the streets of Canada and America, we just don’t hear much about them. Pipes said there is another chance at him. nada’s refugee system is hopelessly flawed.” James Bissett, former head of the Canadian Immigration Service, referring to the Mohammad case as “atrocious, says this is … a powerful example of the fact that we’ve completely lost control of who can enter Canada.”

In fact, Mohammad is just one of several alien terrorists the Canadian legal system renders un-deportable. It’s a devastating indication of how the country does not yet take the terrorist menace seriously. That was September 13, 2004.

On Oct. 19, 2004 update: As noted above, Mohammad was to go on trial on Oct. 14. But he did not after a government lawyer agreed to send the case back for another “risk assessment. Maria Iadinardi, a spokeswoman for Citizenship and Immigration Canada, explains:

There was an error in procedure but I can’t say what it is. Another officer will be looking at the case. And, of course, the timing I can’t speculate because it does take time. All individuals are entitled to due process and it’s that due process that takes time.

Says Pipes: “At this point, the Mohammad case has degenerated into farce. It might be funny if he were not a convicted murderer.”

Read more at DanielPipes.org

Do you want this man to be deported by Canada? If so or if not, click on “Comments” below and tell us why.

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