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>Jewish Children, Happy Passover

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A Happy Passover for Children in Israel

Dear Friend:

Media coverage of Israel often focuses on the nation’s conflict with the Palestinians. Here’s a good-news story that you probably don’t know about-SOS Children’s Villages operates two villages in Israel that provide loving homes and stable communities to neglected children.

“Israel has neglected children?” you’re probably asking. Unfortunately, yes. Luckily, SOS Children’s Village is there to help.   And this Passover season, more than 200 children will celebrate a brighter future full of the freedom to grow, develop and maximize their potential.

SOS has had a presence in Israel since 1981.  The two SOS Children’s Villages are   Neradim Village, Arad, in the south between Beersheba and the Dead Sea; and Megadim Village, Migdal Haemek, in the north, near Nazareth.

At the SOS Israel Villages, vulnerable children are provided a warm, loving, permanent family environment – an incredible experience for children who have been referred by social services and the courts.  Children may come to live in an SOS Village starting at age five, and may remain up to age eighteen.  Sometimes they even stay though their compulsory military service

Besides raising children, SOS Villages also provide shelters for children suffering from the dangers of conflict.  This was the case during the recent rocket attacks on Israel’s southern cities.

SOS children are raised by specially trained SOS mothers in individual houses within the village. They attend local schools and are integrated into the community through sports and art activities.

The Israeli children saved by SOS come to the villages with many problems, but they leave equipped to lead happier, productive lives. Yaacov Zada was only five years old when he and his three older sisters arrived at Neradim Village in Arad. When he was about to enter the Israel Defense Forces, he told the village’s young children: “Since I was young the village was the only place I could feel safe and free.  The village molded me.  It was here I learned the difference between right and wrong.” Yaacov’s transformation was made possible by the love and stability given to all children in an SOS village.

SOS Children’s Villages, operating in 132 countries, is the world’s largest charity dedicated to children who are orphaned, abandoned and neglected.  SOS has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize fourteen times. Click here to learn more about how SOS saves children in Israel and around the world, and about how you can help tikkun olam (repair the world). 

Thank you for your interest in SOS Children’s Villages and I wish you a Happy Passover,

Heather Paul
Executive Director
SOS Children’s Villages – USA

P.S.  Thank you so much for your interest in helping to provide Israeli children with the childhood they deserve.  Click here to make a donation to the work of SOS in Israel.  To save one child is to save ourselves.

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>What Do Jews Believe About Condoms?

>You should click over to Helium for a recent story about condoms. In addition, right here on Don White’s Church Wire is a story indicating the Roman Catholic Church condemns the use of condoms — speaking of the Latin American epidemic.

Here’s a snipit of one of Helium’s stories.

RELIGION AND CONDOM USE

Humankind has known about contraception since ancient times. Early Islamic texts, ancient Jewish sources and sacred Hindu scriptures all refer to various herbal concoctions that claimed to induce temporary sterility. Apart from abstinence, however, condoms are probably the oldest form of effective birth control still in use today. Read more.