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>Is Mitt Romney Like Scott Brown? If So, Goodbye Mitt To Your Presidential Aspirations

>By Don White

Here are my comments made on Mitt Romney’s web site after reading the article below:

 I ‘m a Romney supporter for president, but frankly there was a lot in  your article with which I don’t resonate.

Tea Party people are, generally, for the same things no matter which state they’re from. For example, 1) follow the Constitution strictly; 2) cut the outrageous spending and eliminate deficits (not all in one year); 3 ) that means you must  bring our boys home from Afghanistan and Iraq very soon (not 2014) and drastically cut military spending; 4)  term limits for Congress ; 5) balanced budgets every year; 6) eliminate the Fed; 7) real transparency, not the lies given to us by  Obama, Pelosi, and Reid; 8) close the borders to undocumented people – eliminate the need to finance illegal aliens’ schooling, medical, SS, and infra structure they use on which they pay no taxes.

I could go on and on from there. But unlike you, I believe there is unanimity nationwide on these basic Tea Party positions. If Mitt Romney and Scott Brown must look more like Democrats in order to get elected in Massachusetts, then so be it. But then they are not true conservatives or libertarians, are they? It’s good Scott Brown won the Kennedy senatorial seat, but he’s only half conservative. On more than half of the issues I expect he would vote with us conservatives and libertarians. Better half a cake than none, right?

You said, yourself, Brown is a moderate. Then why does he generally vote with  the Democrats? If Mitt Romney doesn’t start acting like a conservative then I will not be able to support him – as I have in the past with my friends here in Florida. He will lose an election to Barak Obama if he looks much like Obama because voters will always vote for an incumbent if, for no other reason, that the current president will have had four years experience as commander in chief – though we all know he is a terrible leader, loves other countries more than America, and knows next to nothing about a whole host of issues including the economy.

Please, Mr. Romney, don’t compromise the above issues. If so, you will be spending your summers watching the waves in Southern California but won’t ever live in the White House. By the way, if I can be of help to the “conservative” Mr. Romney I would be happy to do so. Don White
dusanotes@yahoo.com   Don White, a Utah – Minnesota – Florida transplant
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Scott Brown, Mitt Romney and the Tea Party’s Wide Open Tent

January 4th, 2011 11:15 amAuthor: BOSMANGo to comments

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A lot is said about the Tea Party by the News media… mostly that they are a far right fringe group who have an ‘our way or the highway’ attitude. To some extent, that attitude may be true. However, what IS NOT clear is, the ‘OUR way’.
Scott Brown is a perfect example of the Tea Party’s wide open tent and appeal. Brown came from nowhere to win Ted Kennedy’s U.S. Senate seat from Massachusetts. A moderate Republican who was urged as a Republican state legislator to run for Kennedy’s seat by former Governor and personal friend, Mitt Romney (who, by the way, STRONGLY supported him through the entire election process).
Brown’s candidacy was the prelude to what was to become one of the largest shake-ups in Congress in the history of American politics. Most people know that I’m a fan of Mitt Romney and like nothing more than to point out Romney’s part in this prelude to the Revolution of 2010.
Here is Brown on election night honoring Romney:
Brown is already on record for backing Mitt Romney in 2012 if he decides to run:
Brown ran on an anti-Obamacare platform. Massachusetts residents were satisfied with their Massachusetts Health Care and did not want Obamacare interfering with this system. Brown received wide support from both Republicans, Independents, and many of who were connected to various Tea Party groups. As a Massachusetts resident myself who has many friends in the so-called Tea Party ranks, many of who describe me as being to the right of Attila The Hun, supported Brown myself. Was I 100% satisfied with Scott Brown’s views on all issues? No! Saying that, I am a realist and knew that a far right candidate would not have won here. So I backed Brown 110% and so did many of those Tea Party friends.
Over his brief tenure as Senator, Brown has remained popular in this state. A recent PPP pollgave him the second highest favorability rating among all the U.S. Senators.
Today, Scott Brown was given the title of ‘Bostonian of the Year‘ by the Boston Globe. The full story can be found HERE. It was this story that prompted me to write this piece.
The point I’m trying to make is this: NO ONE decides what the Tea Party likes or dislikes. As with many things in life, including the Massachusetts Health Care system, when it comes to using it as the basis of Obamacare, it’s not a ONE SIZE FITS ALL.
So, when you read that the “Tea Party” wantsthis or the “Tea Party” doesn’t like that, be a little skeptical. The Tea Party’s emphasis on issues can vary from state to state, region to region.
The Tea Party is a movement. The political tastes of those in the movement vary. There are Centrists, Moderates, Conservatives, Independents, and Republicans — all under the same tent. Don’t be fooled by trying to fit its members into a mold. You won’t be successful.

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Answers.com > Wiki Answers > Categories > History Politics and Society > Politics and Society > Politics and Policy > US Constitution > Why does the Supreme Court session begin on the first Monday in October?

History Behind First Monday:

Congress in 1916 advanced the convening of the Supreme Court from the second Monday in October, fixed in 1873, to the first (beginning in 1917). This measure, drafted by Justice James C. McReynolds, was intended to expand the Court’s capacity for handling its growing docket.

First Mondays are solemn, ceremonial occasions. The chief justice opened the proceedings at noon until 1961 and thereafter, as noted in Supreme Court Rule 4 (1) (2003), at ten o’clock. Tributes are offered to retired and deceased colleagues and court officers. New justices take their judicial oaths, solicitors general are presented, and attorneys are admitted to the Court’s bar. Fidelity to the rule of law is symbolized by the presence of members of the executive and legislative branches, as in 1962 when President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson attended during the then‐raging Mississippi racial crisis. Other symbolically significant First Mondays have been signaled by the presence of the first black page (1954), the first black justice (1967), and the first woman justice (1981).

Little business was traditionally transacted in the usually brief First Monday proceedings. Circuit allotments were reported and arguments on motions were presented. The most important event was the release of a lengthy orders list of dispositions of certiorari petitions. Civil rights litigation shook the placid First Monday tradition in 1958, when Justice Felix Frankfurter filed his concurring opinion in Cooper v. Aaron and in 1964 when the Court heard arguments on the public accommodations section of the new Civil Rights Act on opening day. Similarly oral arguments on the First Monday occurred intermittently thereafter until 1975, when the Court began regularly scheduling oral arguments on that day. A politically symbolic but defunct First Monday tradition, which lasted from 1917 until World War II, was adjournment for a White House visit.