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Archive for the ‘death’ Category

>This Mass Murderer Won’t Die, But He Refuses To Fade Away

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Libya Protesters Defiant After Gadhafi Speech
Heavy gunfire broke out in Tripoli as forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi tightened their grip on the Libyan capital while anti-government protesters claimed control of many cities elsewhere and top government officials and diplomats turn against the longtime leader. While residents of cities in the eastern half of the country celebrated, raising the flags of the old monarchy, the mood in Tripoli was bleak. Residents were afraid to leave their houses, saying pro-Gadhafi forces were opening fire randomly in the streets.
BLOG POSTS
Benjamin R. Barber: Why Libya Will Not Be Democratic
What are the possible scenarios if Gadhafi survives the tumult? What happens if he does not survive? The one thing I am certain about is that, either way, the outcome is likely to be tragic rather than democratic.
Evelyn Leopold: Libya at UN: A Bridge Too Far
The UN Security Council condemned the violence in Libya, deplored the regime’s crackdown and said those responsible for killing some 300 people should be held accountable — a sign that Colonel Moammar Gadhafi has few friends.

>297 Killed In Streets Of Egypt

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WORLD
297 Killed During Egypt Protests: Human Rights Watch
POLITICS
Obama Administration Calls Out GOP Governors Over Health Care

>Genealogy, AKA Family History, Is Fun And Very Rewarding

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Genealogy – how to get started

In order to find a person, you must have some basic information, like full name, date and place of birth, marriage or death or an exact address in a year with a census.


What You Need To know Before You Start

It would be almost impossible to find a great-grandmother for instance, if all you knew was her name, and that she came from Denmark. Our records come from hundreds of local agencies, and there is no huge index or computer file that covers all of them.

In order to find a person, you must have some basic information. Otherwise, you will not know in which records to look for him or her. Information to get you started could be:

* Full name
* plus either
* Date and place of birth, marriage or death or
* An exact address in a year with a census.


Things That Could Give You A Clue…

If you only have scanty information about your ancestors, the first thing to do would naturally be to ask elderly relatives or friends what they remember. Make notes of names, places and dates, although they may not be totally accurate. If there are none left to ask, you may find valuable clues in for instance:

* Certifcates of birth, death, etc. – bring copies if you come to the archives
* Old letters – look for names, places, etc.
* Envelopes – look for addresses and postal stamps.
* Photos – look for photographer´s address, it may be a clue.


Beware Of Family Myths

Most families have various stories about their past. Such traditions can have lots of valuable information – but beware!

Family tradition is – as oral tradition in general – often colourful and vivid, and tends to concentrate on the exciting things, that made this particular family something special.

Not all stories are reliable, and it happens frequently that an alleged illegitimate daugther af a local count will end up with parents who are smallholders or farmers – but not necessarily less interesting!


Beware Of Suspicious Names And Place
s

From parents or grandparents you might have been given names of various ancestors. You might also have been told where they came from, or where they lived. Such information is not always 100% correct.

Please remember that many emigrants changed their names. Maybe friends and authorities in the new country had difficulties spelling or pronouncing the original name. Or maybe the emigrant just wanted to change name in order to “blend in”.

Places of origin that you have been told about might also be slightly wrong. Many mistakes, misspellings etc. can have occurred during the trip across the Atlantic.

If an emigrant was asked “where she came from”, she might not give her place of birth, but instead the name of a city or village, that was her last residence before leaving. And if she lived in the vicinity of a market town or larger city, she might give the name of this – to her – more dominant landmark. And so, “Marie Jensen” from the suburb of Valby might quickly end up as “Mary Johnson from Copenhagen”.

>Anger in The Aftermath

>GRIEF IN JUYUAN
Facts of this article were gathered from Yahoo and AP accounts

Juyuan, China, May 15, 2008—Like most national disasters, feelings of the Chinese are razor taut. Friends and family of the victims have begun pointing fingers because there is a feeling of hopelessness and grief all around them. It happened in Hurricane Katrina and it’s happening in China, as recovery of the dead drags on.

Parents say they were only allowed to begin identifying their children on Wednesday. The disaster occurred on Monday. The bodies had remained inside the gated grounds of Xinjian Primary School for two days until officials began transporting them to the morgue on Wednesday.

The earthquake struck at 2:28 p.m. on Monday, and many parents rushed to the school. Xinjian had about 600 pupils, ages from roughly 7 to 12. When parents arrived most of the building had collapsed. They frantically pulled away bricks and chunks of concrete with their bare hands.

“We pleaded with the administrators to help us,” said one mother, Chen Li, 39, who came to the morgue on Wednesday to identify her son, a sixth grader. “We yelled, ‘Where are the soldiers? Send them to help us!’ ”

Ms. Chen said her son, Zhang Yuanxin, was discovered the same day as the earthquake but then left uncovered in the rain with other bodies on the playground. She said two trucks arrived Wednesday and carried away bodies shortly before Mr. Wen arrived for his inspection.

“I think there were 50 bodies in two trucks that were carried away,” Ms. Chen said. “I asked those people, ‘Are you taking the bodies away?’ ”
But she said local officials lied to her and said they were only taking away tents.

Parents say they became so angry over the situation at the school by Tuesday that they formed a committee and complained to local officials. Officials in Dujiangyan could not be reached by reporters for comment, but parents say the officials relented on Wednesday by moving the children’s bodies to the morgue and providing shuttle buses for people waiting outside the school.

At the morgue on Wednesday, parents walked through rooms lined with bodies on the floor, lifting sheets in the unwanted search to identify a lost child. Cai Changrong, 37, held an urn containing the ashes of his cremated 9-year-old daughter. His wife, Hu Xiu, could not stop wailing.

“We didn’t find any bruises or injuries on her body,” said Ms. Hu, the mother. “But she lost all her nails. She was trying to scratch her way out. I think my daughter suffocated to death.”

Several parents have called for an investigation into the construction quality of school buildings in Dujiangyan. They say six schoolhouses collapsed in the city, even as other government buildings remain standing. One man said officials built two additional stories on the Xinjian school even though it had failed a safety inspection two years ago — allegations that could not be verified.

Mr. Li, the father dressing his dead daughter, also said he believed that the school was poorly built. He arrived at the school minutes after the quake and spent the next four hours searching for his daughter. His forearms were bruised and his fingernails were split and bloodied from digging.

He proudly handed over his cellphone and showed a picture of his daughter, Ke, taken last week. But Thursday morning, he and his wife were preparing for her cremation. They struggled to slip her into the pink pajamas and then dressed her in a gray sweatshirt and pants. Her mother placed a white silk mourning cloth under her clotted black hair.

Mr. Li said he lost his job in 1997 and had been living on a meager welfare payment. He said the school was filled with children from poor families. “My daughter was a very good student,” he said. “She was a quiet girl, and she liked to paint. We’re putting her in these clothes because she loved them.”

He said he was angry and sad. He said his daughter’s body was still warm when he found her at the morgue on Wednesday. He wondered how long she lived beneath the rubble. And then he turned away, leaning down slightly, and whispered in her ear.

“My little daughter,” he said quietly. “You used to dress yourself. Now I have to do it for you.”