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>Why The American Economy Fell Off The Cliff

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EVER WONDERED WHY AMERICA‘S ECONOMY FELL OFF THE CLIFF??
READ ON….

John Smith started the day early having set his alarm clock
(MADE IN JAPAN) for 6 am.
While his coffeepot
(MADE IN CHINA)
was perking, he shaved with his
electric razor
(MADE IN HONG KONG)
He put on a
dress shirt
(MADE IN SRI LANKA),
designer jeans
(MADE IN SINGAPORE)
and
tennis shoes
(MADE IN KOREA)
After cooking his breakfast in his new
electric skillet
(MADE IN INDIA)
he sat down with his
calculator
(MADE IN MEXICO)
to see how much he could spend today. After setting his
watch
(MADE IN TAIWAN)
to the radio
(MADE IN INDIA)
he got in his car
(MADE IN GERMANY)
filled it with GAS
(from Saudi Arabia)
and continued his search
for a good paying AMERICAN JOB.
At the end of yet another discouraging
and fruitless day
checking his
Computer
(made in MALAYSIA),
John decided to relax for a while.
He put on his sandals
(MADE IN BRAZIL),
poured himself a glass of
wine
(MADE IN FRANCE)
and turned on his
TV
(MADE IN INDONESIA),
and then wondered why he can’t
find a good paying job
in AMERICA
AND NOW HE’S HOPING HE CAN GET HELP FROM A PRESIDENT….MADE IN KENYA
Y’all gotta Keep this one circulating, please!

>In Search of Bruis, A Castle Near Cherbourg, France

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Chateu De Bouceel, probably not Brues Castle, but like the castle it is located near Cheerbourg, Normandy, France and gives you a little flavor of local building building materials and possibly the color of the original castle. See The Bruce Family: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Ridge/5850/bruce.html
http://www.medievalsources.co.uk/finish%20pdfs/VanHC.pdf#page=11 requires payment of a fee to see and/or use their documents that answer the following questions.

Who were the Normans from whence Robert De Bruce et all come?
The Normans in Europe[Enter]
Translated and edited by Elisabeth van Houts

This book provides a selection from the abundant source material generated by the Normans and the peoples they conquered. As this study demonstrates, few other medieval peoples generated historical writing of such quantity and quality. This book takes a wide European perspective on the Normans, assessing and explaining Norman expansion, their political and social organisation and their eventual decline. The Normans in Europe explores such areas as: the process of assimilation between Scandinavians and Franks and the emergence of Normandy; the internal organisation of the principality with a variety of source materials from chronicles, miracle stories and chapters; the role of women and children in Norman society; the main chronicle sources for the history of the Norman invasion and settlement; the contacts between William once he became king of England and the territorial princes of France and the progress of the Normans amongst the first settlers in Southern Italy and elsewhere in the Mediterranean. This valuable addition to our Manchester Medieval Sources series addresses a key subject within undergraduate and ‘A’ level courses. The Normans in Europe covers a much wider range of topics than anything currently available in this field, and provides a fascinating insight into Norman society and culture.

Entry to page one of the collection of documents for browsing and reading. A full contents list below is provided so you can find the document you are searching for quickly. Please note the list of contents below only work if you have a Netscape 4.7 browser or above. The contents are reproduced within the document itself enter here.

Acknowledgements
List of abbreviations
Introduction
I: From vikings to Normans
Introduction
1 Charter of King Charles the Simple, 17 December 905
2 Charter of King Charles the Simple, 22 February 906
3 Charter of King Charles the Simple, 14 March 918
4 Dudo of Saint-Quentin, History of the Dukes of the Normans
5 Norman annals, 842-915
6 William of Jumièges, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans
7 The Discovery and Miracles of St Vulfran
8 The Miracles of Coutances
9 The Plaintsong of William Longsword
10 Flodoard of Reims, Annals
11 Adémar of Chabannes, Chronicle
12 Geoffrey Malaterra, Deeds of Count Roger and his brother Duke Robert
13 The Life of Gruffydd ap Cynan
14 Snorri Sturluson, Heimskringla, Saga of Harald Fairhair
II: The Normans in Normandy
Introduction
15 William of Jumièges, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans
16 Gilbert Crispin, Life of Herluin of Bec
17 William of Poitiers, Deeds of Duke William
18 Charter from Jumièges on a substituted child
19 Charters from Rouen cathedral and Saint-Pierre at Préaux
20 Orderic Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History (on the character of the Normans)
21 The Discovery and Miracles of St Vulfran
22 The Miracles of Fécamp
23 Marsilia of Saint-Amand, Letter to Abbot Bovo II of Saint-Amand (Elnone)
24 Milo Crispin, On the origin of the Crispin family
25 Eadmer of Canterbury, History of Recent Events
26 Dudo of Saint-Quentin, History of the Dukes of the Normans (on Gunnor)
27 Warner of Rouen, Moriuht poem
28 Robert of Torigni, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans (on Gunnor)
29 Robert of Torigni, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans (on Empress Matilda)
30 Geoffrey Malaterra, Deeds of Count Roger and his brother Duke Robert
III: The Normans and Britain: the Norman Conquest
Introduction
Norman and other continental narratives
31 The Discovery and Miracles of St Vulfran
32 William of Jumièges and Orderic Vitalis, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans
33 William of Poitiers, Deeds of Duke William
34 Baudri of Bourgueil, Poem for Adela
35 Guy of Amiens, Song of the Battle of Hastings
36 Lanfranc of Canterbury, Letter to Bishop Geoffrey of Coutances
37 The Ship List of William the Conqueror
38 Bavarian annals, 1066
39 Fulcoius of Beauvais, Jephthah poem
English narratives
40 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, version C
41 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, version D
42 Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, version E
43 John of Worcester, Chronicle
44 Eadmer of Canterbury, History of Recent Events
45 Henry of Huntingdon, History of the English People
46 The Waltham Chronicle
47 William of Malmesbury, Life of Wulfstan
48 William of Malmesbury, Deeds of the Kings of the English
49 Herman of Bury St Edmunds, Miracles of St Edmund
50 Giso of Wells, ‘Autobiography’
Wales and Scotland
51 The Life of Gruffydd ap Cynan
52 William of Malmesbury, Deeds of the Kings of the English
IV: The Normans and their neighbours
Introduction
France
53 William of Jumièges, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans
54 Helgaud, Life of Robert the Pious
55 Fulbert of Chartres, Letters (concerning Normandy)
56 The Life of St Simon of Vexin
57 The Short Account of William the Most Noble Count
58 Suger of Saint-Denis, Life of Louis VI
59 Lambert of Wattrelos, Annals
Maine, Anjou and Brittany
60 William of Poitiers, Deeds of Duke William Aquitaine
61 Charter of Jumièges, 1012
62 Adémar of Chabannes, Chronicle
63 The Miracles of Sainte-Foy
Burgundy
64 Rodulfus Glaber, History
65 Rodulfus Glaber, Life of St William of Volpiano
Flanders
66 The Treaty between Henry I of England and Robert II of Flanders, 1101
V: The Normans in the Mediterranean
Introduction
Italy
67 Wipo, Deeds of Conrad II
68 Adémar of Chabannes, Chronicle
69 Rodulfus Glaber, History
70 William of Apulia, Poem on the Deeds of Robert Guiscard
71 Geoffrey Malaterra, Deeds of Count Roger and his brother Duke Robert
72 Amatus of Montecassino, History of the Normans
73 Robert Guiscard, Pledge to Pope Nicholas II, 1059
74 Orderic Vitalis, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans
75 Orderic Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History
76 Robert of Torigni, Deeds of the Dukes of the Normans
Byzantium
77 Anna Comnena, Life of Alexius Comnenus (on Robert Guiscard)
78 Anna Comnena, Life of Alexius Comnenus (on Roussel of Bailleul)
79 Michael Psellus, Fourteen Byzantine Rulers (on Robert Crispin)
80 Amatus of Montecassino, History of the Normans
Spain
81 Dudo of Saint-Quentin, History of the Dukes of the Normans
82 Adémar of Chabannes, Chronicle (on Roger of Tosny)
83 Amatus of Montecassino, History of the Normans (on Robert Crispin)
84 Orderic Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History (on Robert Bordet)
85 Priest Raol, The Conquest of Lisbon
The Holy Land
86 Orderic Vitalis, Ecclesiastical History
87 Eadmer of Canterbury, History of Recent Events
References
Further reading
Genealogical charts
1 The counts of Rouen and dukes of Normandy
2 The counts of Rouen and dukes of Normandy
3 The dukes of Normandy
4 The dukes of Normandy and kings of England
5 The Anglo-Saxon kings
6 The Crispin family
7 The Hauteville family
8 The Norman princes of Capua
Maps
1 Europe
2 Normandy
3 Britain
4 Southern Italy
Index


Cherbourg
Seaport (pop., 1999: 25,370) and naval station, northwestern France. Located on the English Channel, it is believed to occupy the site of an ancient Roman station. The French and English fought over the site in the Middle Ages. It was taken by the English in 1758, then passed to France and was extensively fortified by Louis XVI. In World War II the Germans held it until the Allies captured it in 1944; it became an important Allied supply port. Industries include transatlantic shipping, shipbuilding, and the manufacture of electronics and telephone equipment. Yachting and commercial fishing are also important.

But what about in the tenth century, and the Bruis Castle?

>How The LHC Will Be Powerful Enough To Transmit Data Faster Than Today’s Web

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The network, dubbed the Grid, has been set up by the Cern labs in Geneva to tap into the processing power of computers in 12 countries.

The aim of the project is to handle data from an experiment on how the Universe began.

Cern believes the Grid could eventually provide people access to a vast pool of processing power from their desktops.

Next-gen net

The idea behind Grid technology is to link up computers around the world over the internet to create a new generation of enormously powerful machines.

The networks are needed because some problems in science are just too large for any one machine to tackle by itself.

Cern’s Grid will initially be used to handle the terabytes of data generated by an upcoming particle accelerator called the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

The technology now being deployed for particle physics will ultimately change the way that science and business are undertaken in the years to come
Ian Halliday, PParc

The LHC is going to test the Big Bang theory by smashing protons together at high energies.

The data generate by the experiment are expected to fill the equivalent of more than 20 million CDs a year and some 70,000 computers would be needed to analyse the data.

With the LHC Computing Grid project, scientists will be able to access computing resources across the world as though they were on their machine.

“The Grid enables us to harness the power of scientific computing centres wherever they may be to provide the most powerful computing resource the world has to offer,” said Les Robertson, project manager at Cern.

‘Profound effect’

The first phase covers processing resources from research institutes in 12 countries – the UK, the US, Switzerland, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Russia, Spain, and Taiwan.

The final goal of the Grid is to bring together the computing power of scientific centres across the world to create a virtual supercomputer network.

In the long-term, Grid technology is predicted to revolutionise the world of computing. Ultimately it is expected to be able to provide huge processing power on tap to anyone.

“The technology now being deployed for particle physics will ultimately change the way that science and business are undertaken in the years to come,” said Ian Halliday, Chief Executive of the UK’s Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council, (PParc).

“This will have a profound effect on the way society uses information technology, much as the worldwide web did.”

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is being built in a circular tunnel 27 km in circumference. The tunnel is buried around 50 to 175 m. underground. It straddles the Swiss and French borders on the outskirts of Geneva.

It planned to circulate the first beams in May 2008. First collisions at high energy are expected mid-2008 with the first results from the experiments soon after.
Large Hadron Collider: The Discovery Machine

A global collaboration of scientists is preparing to start up the greatest particle physics experiment in history

>Large Hadron Collider, LHC

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LHC in popular culture

* Decipher by Stel Pavlou features the Large Hadron Collider and describes it to significant accuracy in even though the novel was published in 2001, seven years before the LHC was finished being built.
* Flashforward (novel) by Robert J. Sawyer begins at the LHC. Also written some years before the LHC had finished being built.
* Angels & Demons by Dan Brown involves dangerous antimatter created at the LHC used as a weapon against the Vatican. CERN published a “Fact or Fiction?” page discussing the accuracy of the book’s portrayal of the LHC, CERN, and particle physics in general. [32] The movie version of the book had footage filmed on-site at one of the experiments at the LHC; the director, Ron Howard, also met with CERN experts in an effort to make the science in the story more accurate