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>Tom And Chris Glavine Have It Going Right

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Tom and Chris Glavine with their children. A great looking family.

This is a handsome couple, two people who completely compliment each other.


Thomas Michael Glavine (born March 25, 1966 in Concord, Massachusetts) is an American left-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Atlanta Braves.

During the 1990s, Glavine was one of the winningest pitchers in the National League. He is a five-time 20-game winner and two-time Cy Young Award winner, and one of only 23 pitchers (and just 5 left-handers) in major league history to earn 300 career wins. He is also known as an excellent fielding and hitting pitcher. Even he will tell you this isn’t his year (2008).

Raised in Billerica, Massachusetts, Glavine attended Billerica Memorial High School, where he was an excellent student and a letterman in ice hockey as well as baseball. He was a four-year member of the honor roll and the National Honor Society. In hockey, as a senior, he was named the Merrimack Valley’s Most Valuable Player. In baseball, he led his team to the Division I North Title and the Eastern Massachusetts Championship as a senior. Glavine graduated from high school in 1984 with honors. He was elected to the Billerica Memorial/Howe High School Athletic Hall of Fame in 1993.

Post-high school

Glavine was drafted by both the Los Angeles Kings in the 1984 NHL Entry Draft (in the 4th round, 69th overall—five rounds ahead of future National Hockey League stars Brett Hull and Luc Robitaille), and the Atlanta Braves Major League Baseball organization in the 2nd round of the 1984 amateur baseball draft. Glavine elected to play baseball and made his major league debut on August 17, 1987.

Atlanta Braves

Glavine got his first career win against the Pittsburgh Pirates, hitting Barry Bonds in the back (years later, Bonds hit his 756th career home run the same week Glavine got his 300th career win). Glavine enjoyed good times and bad times during his first several years in the majors, compiling a 33–43 record from 1987 to 1990, including a 17-loss performance in 1988.

His fortunes turned around in 1991, when he won 20 games and posted a 2.55 earned run average. It was his first of three consecutive seasons with 20 or more wins, and saw him earn his first National League Cy Young Award. Glavine was the ace on the 1991 Braves’ starting rotation that also included Steve Avery, Charlie Leibrandt, and another future NL Cy Young Award winner, John Smoltz. His season helped ensure a dramatic reversal in the Braves’ competitive fortunes as they won the National League pennant and earned a trip to the World Series, though they lost to the Minnesota Twins in seven games. In an era of the diminishing 20-game winner (there were none in the majors in 2006), Glavine became the last major league pitcher—and the only pitcher active in 2007—to win 20 games in three consecutive years (1991–1993).

Atlanta, long thought of as a perennial cellar dweller, was lifted in the 1990s into one of the most successful franchises in the game on the strength of its stellar pitching staff and solid hitting. After the Braves acquired Greg Maddux from the Chicago Cubs in 1993, Glavine, Maddux, and Smoltz formed the best pitching rotation of the decade. Among them, they won seven Cy Young Awards during the period of 1991 to 1998. Glavine won his second Cy Young Award in 1998, going 20–6 with a 2.47 ERA. Years later, after Glavine joined the Mets and Maddux played for the San Diego Padres, the three (along with Smoltz who still pitched for Atlanta) all recorded wins on the same day, June 27, 2007.

The Braves defeated the Cleveland Indians in 6 games in the 1995 World Series, and Glavine was named the Series MVP. He won two games during that series: Game 2 and Game 6. In Game 6, he pitched eight innings of one-hit shutout baseball; in fact, the only run in that game was a solo 6th-inning home run by David Justice of the Braves.

In addition to the championship won with the Braves in 1995, he also went to four other World Series with the team (in 1991, 1992, 1996 and 1999).

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